Handle negative buzz like the pros

ClickZ Live

ClickZ Live – Register today!

I’m excited to share (and self-promote) that I will be participating in the ClickZ Live annual marketing conference in New York City.

 

 

From ClickZ:

Creating the Ultimate Customer Experience

April 11-13, 2016

Attracting 1,000+ marketers and business leaders, our 17th annual event in New York will equip you with cutting edge strategies to inspire, acquire, convert and retain your customers.

Here’s information on my session:

Engage & Convert

Handle Negative Buzz Like the Pros

Trolls are not just pink fuzzy haired dolls; they are lurking in the corners of the ‘net waiting to tear your business apart. But it’s hard to know how to respond or if you should respond. In this session, Dan will take you through several real-world case studies of various strategies for handling negative buzz, working in your organization, and injecting a little levity to keep things calm. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, but most importantly you’ll learn how to use best practices for review engagement to make your brand stand out in new digital era to create real street cred.

Attend this session and:

  • Review real case studies across a number of scenarios
  • Learn when you should and should not reply
  • Discover techniques for replying and converting negative moments to positive wins
  • Unlock the “L.E.A.D.E.R.” acronym and achieve success fast

Essentially, I will spend the session walking participants through the LEADER methodology that I have developed over the past decade with regards to handling negative comments that pop up online.

Companies should not uses consumer’s social content without opt-in

It’s a great article that explores a number of pertinent topics with regards to consumer generated content (photos, tweets, etc.) on social media and how companies may leverage that content for their own marketing campaigns.

I do think the article misses two key points, however.

First, a 37-year-old mom of a 4-year-old daughter should know better. But the problem is that the general public is extremely naive. They think what they post online is private, or reserved for only a select few. Even worse, many people have no concept that what they post online, even for a few moments, can come back and haunt them for years. Use this rule of thumb: don’t post anything online that you wouldn’t want your dear old grandma to see. But in the example in the article, this post pasts that test. So then what’s the problem? The problem is that she didn’t want Crocs to use the photo. In a moment, I’ll get to why Crocs screwed up royally… But first, if you don’t want strangers seeing photos of your kids, stop posting them online! Stop talking about your child’s hissy fit or medical problems too… when they are old, their classmates will use these things as bullying opportunities. In this case, the mom even hashtagged the brand term. That sort of says, “hey brand, come and get my photo!”

Crocs broke a core marketing principal when they did not seek her permission to use the photo. Seeking permission is so easy. It’s a great opportunity to engage a fan, thank them, possibly reward them, encourage them to continue sharing, and so on… However, this didn’t happen, nor did they get the mom’s permission. Yet somehow the picture showed up on their site.

There are exceptions of course… In my opinion if you pull a social feed, moderated but unmodified, and post it on your site, that’s fine… The content is easily attributed back to the social source and no one for a minute thinks those users are participating in a marketing campaign without their permission.

It’s very easy for brands to go from good to evil, and not seeking permission can be the pathway. But to prevent it from happening, users should think carefully about what they share online, and even how they tag it.

Social Media in Sweden

I’m excited to announce I have been added to the speakers list at Bring Dialogue’s annual conference taking place in Strömstad, Sweden August 23-26. I will be hosting a workshop on my trademark L.E.A.D.E.R. strategy for social media engagement to 500+ attendees from across the European Union in this large marketing conference that focuses on branding, CRM, social media and other emerging trends in the world of marketing.

Here’s the link to the conference web site (sorry, some of it is in Swedish): http://www.dialogkonferansen.com/2015/.

I’ll provide more links and info as they are made available.

Back on Tour in 2015

As many of you know, I took a new full-time position with Ultimate Medical Academy earlier this year. On top of the new job (which required relocating my tribe from the DC Metro to Tampa, FL), being a dad for a toddler required a brief hiatus from the speakers circuit. I’m pleased to announce that I’m back on tour in 2015 with the first two stops announced:

In Las Vegas, I’ll be hosting a two-hour workshop on engagement and listening strategies. I will also be discussing my “trademark” approach to social media – LAETER”. Here are the details:

Your customers are talking about you on the internet whether or not you’re listening. A few negative comments can cause your reputation and sales to plummet; while a happy customer can evangelize time and time again. This hands-on session will provide attendees with social listening strategies that can keep their team and their C-level executives on the forefront of what’s being said about their brand (and competitors) – and how to plan a proactive rather than reactive approach.

Takeaways include:

  • Tips and tools for listening (and what to listen for)
  • Using the “LAETER” approach (listen, acknowledge, empathize, triage, escalate and resolve)
  • When not to respond and how to address trolls
  • Adding value to your business
  • Educating employees on the importance of corporate reputation on social media

For Chicago, I’ll be giving a 45-minute presentation on branding via social media:

Should you argue with your customers on Facebook? How do you draw the line between defending your business and antagonizing a troll? Your customers are talking about you on the internet whether or not you’re listening. A few negative comments can cause your reputation and sales to plummet; while a happy customer can evangelize time and time again. But not all negative comments can spell trouble. Learn how to engage unhappy customers and turn them into brand evangelists. It works and we’ll show you how. We’ll also help you spot potential land mines so that you don’t make things worse. It’s an art as much as it is a science.

Takeaways include:

  • Using the “LAETER” approach (listen, acknowledge, empathize, triage, escalate and resolve)
  • When not to respond and how to address trolls
  • How to fight back and when to throw in the towel